J. K. Smith
Professor John Doe
English 101
15 June 2022
A Modern Phenomenon: Cancel Culture
The cancel culture is a modern phenomenon made possible by the digitalization of our lives. It
allows the masses to effectively destroy someone’s career or even livelihood using the wonders
of the world wide web. This is an extremely powerful tool that can do a lot of good in the right
hands. But, the question here is whether the court of public opinion can be trusted with
dispensing justice. Does it bring more harm than good? Should we avoid it whenever possible?
Let’s investigate it.
What is the difference between the public’s cancel culture lynch mob and a conventional
court? In most cases, it’s the reliability of the information available. A court investigation goes
through a painstaking process of separating truths from fabrication. This can take months or even
years and still not be enough to protect the innocent from false imprisonment. Corruption and
personal bias can also negatively affect the outcome of a trial. Still, the chances of passing the
wrong judgment are considerably lower when compared to the practices of the cancel culture.
The cancel culture, on the other hand, tends to be fueled by emotional outrage rather than
cold logic. Without due process, wild accusations may pass for credible information. Once the
pain train starts rolling, it’s virtually impossible to stop it. Moreover, those responsible for falsely
accusing an innocent in a court of public opinion are rarely held to it. As such, there are many
cases of the cancel culture being used maliciously or for personal gain. A single careless post can

permanently tarnish someone’s reputation. In some cases, the damage lasts even after a proper
investigation reveals they were innocent all along. With people getting more tech-savvy and
critical of the information they consume, the impact of the cancel culture can be reduced.
However, it remains a powerful and lethal weapon that can be used by virtually anyone. And
that’s what makes it dangerous and unpredictable.
It is obvious that both approaches have their pros and cons. That said, we cannot choose
one or the other. They already coexist. The deep institutionalized nature of one and the
widespread and chaotic nature of the other make it virtually impossible to refuse either one
altogether. However, we should always strive to work on and improve our ways. And when it
comes to the cancel culture (and consumption of public information in general) it becomes
imperative in the modern age to learn how to separate reliable data from speculation or
misinformation

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