Some students may struggle when it comes to creating an argumentative essay because it might seem too complex and multilayered. Don’t worry, we’re here to help you. Argumentative essays are usually assigned to students on SAT, ACT, IELTS, and TOEFL tests. This type of paper can also be assigned as coursework.

Learning this style of writing is the beginning of your journey to getting the grades that you deserve. Read this article if you want to learn how to write an argumentative essay. Ask ‘write essay for me‘ to get help from our essay writing service.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is a style of academic writing where an author presents both sides of an argument or issue. The main purpose of an argumentative essay is to inform rather than convince – that’s why this type of paper should not be confused with a persuasive essay.

The following skills are evaluated when grading an argumentative essay:

  • Research skills
  • Writing skills
  • Analytical skills

This type of paper is assigned to train a student’s ability to debate. It can therefore greatly influence the public speaking skills of a person later on in their life. When writing an argumentative essay, it is important to focus on facts and information rather than personal ideas or preferences. The author may present arguments equally, or support one in favour of others. Regardless, the thesis must include all of the primary points (and counterpoints) that will appear in the essay. It is almost like a political debate with oneself.

Elements of an Argumentative Essay

  • Position: It’s essential to determine which side of the argument you are taking. For example, you may be arguing that tobacco products or cannabis should be made illegal. Make a point to express why you took your initial position. For example, you may provide exact reasons to show how tobacco products may be damaging people’s health.
  • Evidence: This is where you should provide factual substantiation for your reasons from outside resources. It is very important to give citations and references for where you gathered your evidence. If there is no proof, the evidence may not be taken into account. For example, you could cite health studies or scientific papers related to the effects of tobacco products on peoples’ health to prove your statement.
  • Counterarguments: This is where you need to present the other side of the issue. Provide the opposing argument from your point of view. After stating these counterarguments, you should state why they are false, weak, or ineffective by presenting further evidence.
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