Tuberculosis is caused by a bacterial infection triggered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, generally from the lungs, though it was also transmitted until lately through the intake of infected milk and meat (Douglas, 2013, p. 155). Also, TB was regarded as a chronic condition as infection remained permanent until antibiotic therapy schemes developed after World War II (Douglas, 2013, p. 156).  In the past, TB was one of the deadliest epidemic diseases affecting the Aboriginal population (Douglas, 2013, p. 156). The chance of developing active TB is very small for most individuals in Canada. But, the levels of active TB among Indigenous individuals born in Canada are greater. In Inuit Nunangat’s TB incidence among Inuit was more than 300 times the prevalence of non-Indigenous Canadians born in 2016 (Government of Canada, 2019). In other words, a lot of Aboriginal people are affected by this disease. Furthermore, the TB incidence among First Nations residing on the reserve is more than 50 times greater than non-Indigenous Canadians born in Canada (Government of Canada, 2019). Since most of the Aboriginal people dealt with this epidemic illness there are factors that contribute to the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis, the pertinent nursing implications will provide interventions that can improve the facets of overall health and wellness of the Aboriginal peoples, tackling the available resources from the federal government to reduce and aim a total eradication of TB among the First Nations communities.

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